3D Printing Hype

3D Printing Insider Myths and Truths

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3D Printing, Manufacturing and the Government – Can We 3D Print Some Jobs?

A new report released by the Brookings Institution points to the disproportionate impact of manufacturing on the U.S. jobs market. It employs 35 percent of engineers, accounts for more than two-thirds of private-sector spending on research and development, and produces fully 65 percent of all U.S. trade. “After 30 years of being told that the

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3D Printing, Manufacturing and the Government – Can We 3D Print Some Jobs?

A new report released by the Brookings Institution points to the disproportionate impact of manufacturing on the U.S. jobs market. It employs 35 percent of engineers, accounts for more than two-thirds of private-sector spending on research and development, and produces fully 65 percent of all U.S. trade. “After 30 years of being told that the

Read more ›

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3D Printed Exhibit of Tibial Plateau Fracture

Above is a sample of 3D printed tibial plateau fracture.  The sample above clearly demarks the fracture and facilitates understanding of the injury in question. This particular print took about six (6) hours and was made with ABS material. ABS is a common material used by 3D printers. Of course, the…

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3D Printed Exhibit of Tibial Plateau Fracture

Above is a sample of 3D printed tibial plateau fracture.  The sample above clearly demarks the fracture and facilitates understanding of the injury in question. This particular print took about six (6) hours and was made with ABS material. ABS is a common material used by 3D printers. Of course, the…

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3D Printing Jobs to Watch For

From 3D Printing MBA 1. 3D design Thanks to its growth, 3D printing will create jobs for 3D designers at 3D printing firms, in companies as part of creative teams, and as freelancers. 2. 3D computer-aided design (CAD) modeling 3D printing would not be possible without CAD experts, who have the skills and expertise to […]

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Business Podcast – Why is Sales Such An Unholy Word?

Why is Sales such an unholy word? Hear two sales guys talking about the sales stigma. Everything you see, from the moment you wake until the moment you sleep has been sold. Maybe some sales training will help?

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Business Podcast – Why is Sales Such An Unholy Word?

Why is Sales such an unholy word? Hear two sales guys talking about the sales stigma. Everything you see, from the moment you wake until the moment you sleep has been sold. Maybe some sales training will help?

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3D Printing Trends – Top 10 3D Printing Trends for 2015

10 Trends in 3D Printing For 2015 from Bill Decker

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Myths and Facts About International Business and International Negotiations

Click on this little chart for quick myths and facts about Global Business

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3D Printing Business Advice – Why is Sales Such an Unpopular Word?

Why is “sales” such an unpopular term?  Listen to a couple of guys whose careers started in sales discuss the use and misuse of the term: “sales”

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3D Printing and 3D Printing Business – Some Major Effects

The world will react to 3D Printing technology, and the trends are clear. Governments that protect labor pools will tax the technology. Many countries adopted protectionist measures to keep citizens employed. These measures were designed to stop foreign competition from selling products in protectionist countries. Nations put tariffs on, for example, Chinese, Japanese and even […]

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3D Printed Injury Exhibits as Persuasive Evidence in Modern Courtrooms

3D printed evidence of injuries presented in a Courtroom as demonstrative evidence may seem avant-garde. Frankly, nothing seems further from the truth. Presenting 3D printed exhibits in Courtroom should be fairly standard. These are just representation in different format of already proven technologies like MRI’s and CT-scans and the like.…

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3D Printing Hype Cycle From the Gartner Group

Gartner’s 2013 Hype Cycle Special Report provides strategists and planners with an assessment of the maturity, business benefit and future direction of more than 2,000 technologies, grouped into 98 areas. New Hype Cycles this year include content and social analytics, embedded software and systems, consumer market research, open banking, banking operations innovation, and information and communication technology (ICT) in Africa.

The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report is the longest-running annual Hype Cycle, providing a cross-industry perspective on the technologies and trends that senior executives, CIOs, strategists, innovators, business developers and technology planners should consider in developing emerging-technology portfolios.

“In making the overriding theme of this year’s Hype Cycle the evolving relationship between humans and machines, we encourage enterprises to look beyond the narrow perspective that only sees a future in which machines and computers replace humans. In fact, by observing how emerging technologies are being used by early adopters, there are actually three main trends at work. These are augmenting humans with technology — for example, an employee with a wearable computing device; machines replacing humans — for example, a cognitive virtual assistant acting as an automated customer representative; and humans and machines working alongside each other — for example, a mobile robot working with a warehouse employee to move many boxes.”

“Enterprises of the future will use a combination of these three trends to improve productivity, transform citizen and customer experience, and to seek competitive advantage,” said Hung LeHong, research vice president at Gartner. “These three major trends are made possible by three areas that facilitate and support the relationship between human and machine. Machines are becoming better at understanding humans and the environment — for example, recognizing the emotion in a person’s voice — and humans are becoming better at understanding machines — for example, through the Internet of things. At the same time, machines and humans are getting smarter by working together.” 3D printing influences the hype cycle. According to William Dante at the 3D Printing Association, he feels “the great game changer is 3D Printing. the adoption rates are faster than the internet, cloud computing and streaming video, combined. The best part is that 3D Printing uses all of this technology anyway.”

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3D Printing Hype -Blog Discusses 3D Printing Reality

While 3D printing is arguably one of the hottest new categories in the technology industry — following mobility and competing with connected cars and wearable technology, the nuts and bolts of 3D printing have been around for decades. However, key patents, restricted materials and the high price of printers has kept the technology firmly within manufacturing for years.

The majority of key patents surrounding additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing, have either expired or come close to expiry, which gives the industry the push required to advance. According to Bits to Atoms founder & Shapeways 3D printing designer Duann Scott, patents filed that detail the laser sintering manufacturing process used in 3D printing — which allow items to be sold on as finished products — have now expired, which could give rise to a host of new, innovative ways to use laser sintering and spur technology advances.

Now that 3D printing has gone beyond the world of manufacturing, we’re seeing a number of interesting and, frankly, odd uses of the technology.

However, while new patents will be filed as the industry evolves in the same manner as mobile technology, lawsuits will happen unless licensing agreements come in to play. Patent squabbles are part-and-parcel of the modern-day technology realm, and they are likely to crop up given the potential of the industry — and this will eventually hamper progress. As big names become involved, this may also prevent smaller players from growing and competing if they cannot afford high licensing costs to use intellectual property.

Despite a number of crowdfunding projects dedicated to the creation of cheap, at the moment, household 3D printers, their range, price and materials are limited. If a business wants to use 3D printing within its supply chain — whether to create products more cheaply or to manufacture individual components — unless they have thousands of dollars to spare to purchase their own kit, they are required to outsource to specialized companies.

A number of tech players are looking at how 3D printing can apply to their business models. General Electric is using 3D printing to produce parts for jet engines, Boeing has created parts for a variety of planes, Hersey’s is printing edible treats in different shapes and, in a darker fashion, Defense Distributed uses home 3D printers to create parts for eye thing.

The technology can be used to improve supply chains, but arguably healthcare is benefiting the most from recent interest in 3D printing. Light, cheap prosthetics and artificial bone printing are only two examples of how 3D printing is making healthcare more affordable, and if the technology is going to have serious impact in a market, I would argue that healthcare is the best bet. ….3D printing increases in popularity, these are the trends we predict to take the tech world by force.

In the consumer realm, firms such as Shapeways allow you to print off your own products — as expensive as it can be — but this is a niche market and is unlikely to expand beyond enthusiasts and those who currently enjoy the novelty factor. We also have to keep in mind that 3D printing in vast amounts often hogs huge amounts of energy, and so may not be viable for smaller businesses and projects beyond prototypes and tiny batches.

While any movement in markets that spurs on competition and innovation are generally beneficial, 3D printing will still only have limited use in the consumer sector. The technology has applications in healthcare, construction and manufacturing, but is unlikely to be suitable as a household product beyond small, novelty printers which may be fun to print out gifts or designs, but no more than a small amount.

The “next big thing” needs to insinuate itself into the consumer realm — as well as the majority of home and businesses to deserve the name. 3D printing, although exciting and interesting, is unlikely to fulfil this role, as it will be a household novelty rather than becoming a household necessity.

While valuable, 3D printing lacks the “revolutionary” label as it will remain in the manufacturing space for a long time to come, and unlike mobile devices — which I would label “revolutionary” due to market spread and often low cost — 3D printers require heavy investment for the kit, materials and maintenance — making it unsuitable for the average home. The technology is within a ‘hype’ stage, but eventually will find its niche within manufacturing and supply chains, novelty products and in the creation of prosthetics in healthcare. Valuable? Absolutely. Revolutionary? It’s your guess.

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3D Printing Doubts – 5 More Reasons 3D Printing Will Fail

1. Awaiting the breakthrough consumer model

Widespread consumer adoption will depend on 3D printers dropping in price. Currently, printers less than $1,000 use a DIY-style kit that requires assembly of the machine itself and they often don’t replicate the CAD designs accurately. But, relatively cheap 3D printers do exist. At $299, the Printrbot Simple is an affordable option, though it is very basic and can’t print high-quality products. Also well under $1,000 is RepRap’s open-source line of printers, which have to be assembled separately. The Cubify Cube is about $1,300 and probably the best desktop option since it connects to wifi, but its plastic filament can’t make anything too sturdy.

For the most part, anything bigger or better than these costs well into the thousands (or even tens of thousands) of dollars. The MakerBot Replicator 2 runs at about $2,200, which was also the roundabout figure for a top-of-the-line computer in the 1980s. Until reliable, convenient, sleek 3D printers hit the market, the revolutionary effects of the technology will be stymied.

2. Expense of SLS printers

Major patents on selective laser sintering (SLS) printers expired in January, so perhaps the prices of these machines—which run as high as $250,000 will decrease. When the patents on fused deposition modeling (FDM) printers expired, there was an explosion of open source FDM printers that led the technology to become a hobby. The best example was MakerBot, which launched as the most well-known FDM printer almost immediately after the FDM patent expired.

SLS printers offer the ability to print with more materials such as glass, metal, plastic, and ceramic, but with the high-powered lasers comes a higher manufacturing price. It may never be as cheap as an FDM machine, and therefore may take a longer time to catch on in the consumer market, if at all.

3. Patents and legal murkiness

This year, many patents on 3D printers will expire, possibly creating more competition, innovation, and lower prices. However, there are still quite a few overlapping patents out there, however, which causes a lot of murkiness. During the last decade, the Patent and Trademark Office has received more than 6,800 3D printing patent applications. Since 2007, almost 700 patents have been filed annually.

Another intellectual property issue comes with what the machines are printing. Right now, it’s easy to log on to Shapeways and download a CAD file of just about anything. But soon, there will be lawsuits and competition between brands over knockoffs and copyright infringement.

4. The usefulness gap

Sure, plastic action figures, iPhone cases, and Star Wars-themed novelties are fun to design and print with a relatively affordable desktop 3D printer like the Cube, but they aren’t exactly impactful on our everyday lives, nor are they convincing consumers the machines are a worthy investment.

“There’s no compelling application in the present time because anything you can print on a 3D printer, besides from things that are truly customized, you can buy at a store,” said Pete Basiliere, lead Gartner analyst for 3D printing. He said a compelling consumer application—something that can only be created at home on a 3D printer—will hit the scene by 2016.

5. Plastic filament isn’t sturdy enough

For the foreseeable future, the cheapest and most accessible 3D printers will be FDM. These are the desktop printers that use PLA and ABS plastic, which easily melt and fit small molds. However, the plastic isn’t sturdy and not many household products with moving parts can be created from the material. Printers will need to use carbon composites or metals to become more useful to the average consumer, as well as manufacturers.